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OAK, MISC

Quercus spp.


A NOTE ABOUT OAK NAMES



Quercus spp. of the family Fagaceae. Even if you totally discount the woods that have oak in one or more of their common names, but are NOT of the genus Quercus, there are, depending on who you listen to, between 300 and 900 varities of oak. I have the species name for 300 of them. Many of the differences are surely small and of interest mainly to botanists, but even so there are still a huge number of varieties that are of interest to woodworkers. Many varieties are posted on the Internet without sufficient information and those I put on this page. Also, some "trade names" or "marketing names" do not specify white or red or English Brown, or any of the normal categories, but instead focus on grain type ("ropey"). Those also end up on this page. Also, there are some well identified species for which I do not have enough samples to warrent their own page and they end up here as well.

my samples:
NOTE: these pics were all taken in very bright incandescent lighting --- colors will vary under other lighting conditions


both sides of a sample plank of Mongolian oak / Quercus mongolica --- HUGE enlargements are present.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of chestnut leaf oak / Quercus castaneifolia --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. This species grows in Iran, Turkey, and the Mediterranean region and is also known as Persian oak and as far as I know it does not grow in (or at least certainly is not native to) North America.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of chestnut leaf oak / Quercus castaneifolia --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The pics do not even begin to do justice to the ray flakes. This species grows in Iran, Turkey, and the Mediterranean region and is also known as Persian oak and as far as I know it does not grow in (or at least certainly is not native to) North America.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of chestnut leaf oak / Quercus castaneifolia --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. This species grows in Iran and the Mediterranean region and is also known as Persian oak.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of chestnut leaf oak / Quercus castaneifolia --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. This species grows in Iran and the Mediterranean region and is also known as Persian oak.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of bluejack oak / Quercus incana --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Caucasian oak / Quercus macranthera --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


first face and the end grain of a sample listed as "Grand Island" oak. I don't know if that is where the sample was collected or was back then a common name for a particular species of oak. None of my reference show it and all I can tell from the end grain characteristics is that this is not a live oak. I'm pretty sure that I see tyloses in the pores which would make it a white oak, but I'm not 100% on that. This part of a collection which is discussed here: COLLECTION B


the second face, before and after slicing off 1/8" showing how the patina from aging is only surface deep.


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above.


first face and the end grain of a sample of swamp oak / Quercus spp. --- This part of a collection which is discussed here: COLLECTION C


the second face, before and after slicing off 1/8" showing how the patina from aging is only surface deep.


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


NOT a raw wood color
a closeup of a finished slab table top, shot in a furniture store because of the interesting wavy grain. The pic was badly focused, unfortunately, so there are no enlargments. The color is yellowish because of the finish


two little cut-offs of ambrosia oak contributed to the site by Rob Mathison whom I thank for this and other contributions. On both these pics and on the pics below, HUGE enlargements are present.


both faces of one of the pices


end grain closeups of the pieces directly above

small piece and end grain. I got this piece before I knew much about wood and for some reason, clearly based entirely on ignorance, I had it as eucalyptus and it was on the site that way for years. I now know that it's an oak and based on the end grain it looks exactly like a piece of laurel oak that I have (which is a red oak) but I can't say for sure that that's what it is. I have no idea where I got it.


end grain and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly


both sides of a piece of oak that has lots of SOMETHING (adventitious buds, embedded tiny branches, I don't know what) and whatever they are they take the form of enlarged, resinous rays that show up as dark spots on the face grain. This piece and the one directly below are from the same tree and were contributed to the site by Rob Mathison whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


face grain and side grain closeups of the piece directly above


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


both sides of a piece of oak that has lots of SOMETHING (adventitious buds, embedded tiny branches, I don't know what) and is from the same tree as the piece directly above.


closeup of the face grain of the piece


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


probably red oak but could be white. This is the butt end of a bunch of planks that have been glued together as part of a large bench in the Exchange Place PATH station in Jersey City, NJ --- this is the arm rest. Obviously treated with some finishing agent, this set of end grain shots really shows clearly how it is that the ray flakes occur in oak when the cut goes parallel to those light colored ray lines. It also shows clearly how the ray lines (very light color) are perpendicular to the grain lines (very dark color); this shows up even better in the enlargement.



The Wood Book pics


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
MacDonald oak (Quercus macdonaldi, which is a misspelling of Quercus macdonaldii) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for each of the 3 views. I don't know if this is a red oak or a white oak, so it's here with the miscellaneous oaks.


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
Spanish oak (Quercus digitata, also listed as finger oak and Spanish oak) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for each of the 3 views. These days, this is more commonly known as Himalayan oak. I don't know if this is in the red oak group or the whit

web pics:





MISC OAK BY FIGURE NOT SPECIES
(OR BY UNKNOWN SPECIES, JUST "OAK")



oak end grain with black-line spalting in the sapwood


rift cut plank with wet and dry sections, just listed as Quercus spp.


cluster burl


pippy planks


burl plank moistened for the pic


burl planks


two views of an oak burl ... GIGANTIC enlargments are present and really show the burl eyes very nicely


oak burl plank with spalting and moistened for the pic


oak burl scales


wormy oak planks ... that second one looks like ambrosia beetle stains


spalted oak plank


flat cut veneer


rift cut veneer


quartersawn veneer


curly veneer


cluster burl veneer


pippy veneer


pippy veneer all from the same vendor (remember, "pippy", for some oak means "burl") --- the color is too pink, but that's typical of this vendor


"pippy" (= "burl") sheet closeup with both enlargements


ropey veneer


burl veneer


very nicely done end grain knife handle


burl oak goblet with captive ring and a spalted oak bottle stopper


spalted oak, planks and bowl, no idea what species


bowl listed as oak burl


three views of a spalted oak bowl


oak burl bowls


feather crotch oak platter shot at a wood shot. The finish was listed as antique oil. HUGE enlargements are present, nicely showing off the feather crotch.


bowl just listed as oak


both sides of a vase listed as just oak; I'm not sure what the dark areas are. Both enlargements are present.


bowls listed as brown oak (probably English brown)


bowl listed as brown oak burl (probably English brown)



DYER OAK (Quercus velutina)



figured planks


both sides of a figured plank


figured planks --- both sides and a closeup


figured planks --- both sides and a closeup


dyer oak turning stock


Dyer oak burl



HOLLY OAK (Quercus ilex)



end grain listed as holly oak / Quercus ilex


planks listed as holly oak / Quercus ilex


plank listed as European evergreen oak / Quercus ilex, but I'm doubtful about this one; it may be mis-identified