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CYPRESS, MISC

Taxodium spp, Cupressus spp. and Chamaecyparis spp.
and others; see fact sheet for details




A NOTE ABOUT CYPRESS SPECIES



NOTE: The family Cupressaceae, the cypress family consists of several genera for which the various species have various flavors of the word "cypress" in their common names. Most, but by no means all, of these are in the three genera mention above. There are numerous other genera in the family that either do not produce wood, or for which the name cypess does not occur in the common names. Previous classifications put the genera Taxodium in the family Taxodiaceae but that has changed. The fact sheet has a more extensive discussion of species and names.

Cypress is one of those woods that was logged enough, and floated on rivers enough, that modern wood reclaimers have salvaged many sunken logs that are from 50 to more than 100 years old. These are called "sinker" cypress or "deadhead" cypress and those terms do not refer to any SPECIES of cypress, but to ANY species of cypress that has sunk in a river and been salvaged. It can be some very pretty stuff.

I have broken out the following with their own pages on this site: And also note that yellow cypress / Cupressus nootkatensis, which IS a cypress, is most often sold in the USA as Alaskan yellow cedar and is on a page of that name on this site.


my samples:
NOTE: these pics were all taken in very bright incandescent lighting ("soft white" at 2700K)
colors will vary under other lighting conditions


both sides of a sample plank of Arizona cypress / Cupressus arizonica


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Arizona cypress / Cupressus arizonica --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


both sides of a sample plank of quartersawn Arizona cypress / Cupressus arizonica --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Arizona cypress / Cupressus arizonica --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Montezuma bald cypress / Taxodium mucronatum --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. This cypress grows primarily in Mexico and Texas


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Baker cypress / Cupressus bakeri --- I thought this should be "Baker's" cypress, but that is not correct. It IS just "baker" cypress, aka Macnab cypress.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Baker cypress / Cupressus bakeri --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Atlantic white cypress / Chamaecyparis thyoides --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. I note that the vendor of this sample has it as Atlantic white "cedar", which IS an alternate name for this species but since it is genus Chamaecyparis, I have put it with the cypress woods.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


first face and the end grain of a sample of Southern white cedar / Chamaecyparis thyoides . This part of a collection which is discussed here: COLLECTION A


the second face, before and after sanding, showing how the patina from aging is only surface deep.


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above.


both sides of a plank of false cypress / Chamaecyparis pisifera --- HUGE enlargements are present. This plank was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The first side is fine sanded, thus the slight difference in color between the two sides.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of sawara cypress / Chamaecyparis pisifera --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Mexican cypress / Cypressus lusitanica --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above --- note the sharp focus on the ruler, showing that the "muddy" look of the end grain is not an effect of the photography.


both sides of a sample plank of Gowan's cypress / Cupressus goveniana --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Italian cypress / Cupressus sempervirens --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The labeled side is raw but the other side has been sanded down to 240 grit and shows up as much cleaner and a slightly fresher color. To see what it looked like before I sanded it, see directly below.


this vendor of samples is exceptionally slovenly in his presentation and I have had to do enormous amounts of work to clean up his shoddy samples before taking pics, but THIS one has to be my favorite --- he actually sent this out as a formal sample, with all this pencil writing on the back. Amazing.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Santa Cruz cypress / Cupressus goveniana --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Japanese cypress / Cryptomeria japonica --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. This wood is known in Japan as sugi and it is the only species in the family Cryptomeria (of the family Cupressaceae, the cypress family, the same as the genera Cupressus and Chamaecyparis). The species has over a dozen synonyms. The species has over a dozen synonyms.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Japanese cypress / Cryptomeria japonica --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Japanese cypress / Cryptomeria japonica --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Mark had this as Japanese cedar but it is a cypress. It is in the family Cupressaceae, the cypress family, not the family Meliaceae which is where the cedars are found. This wood is known in Japan as sugi and it is the only species in the family Cryptomeria. The species has over a dozen synonyms.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Japanese cypress / Cryptomeria japonica --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Mark had this as Japanese cedar but it is a cypress. It is in the family Cupressaceae, the cypress family, not the family Meliaceae which is where the cedars are found. This wood is known in Japan as sugi and it is the only species in the family Cryptomeria. The species has over a dozen synonyms.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


a small chunk of Japanese cypress (hinoki) / Chamaecyparis obtusa loaned to me by Mark Peet, whom I thank.


both sides of a plank of Japanese cypress (hinoki) / Chamaecyparis obtusa loaned to me by Mark Peet, whom I thank.


both sides of a sample plank of Japanese cypress (hinoki) / Chamaecyparis obtusa --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Sargent's cypress / Cupressus sargentii --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Sargent's cypress / Cupressus sargentii --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of mountain cypress / Widdringtonia nodiflora --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of mountain cypress / Widdringtonia nodiflora --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Leyland cypress / Cupressocyparis leylandii --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a stick of cypress, cut from another larger piece from somewhere on this page, shown because I needed to get another end grain update for this wood. HUGE enlargements are present.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a stick of cypress, cut from another larger piece from somewhere on this page, shown because I needed to get another end grain update for this wood. HUGE enlargements are present


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


one section and a closeup of a 12-foot long plank


another section, and closeup, of the same plank as directly above


planks photographed at a woodworking store --- very large enlargements are present


set of small pieces


two views of the same piece. The bowl at the bottom of this page was made from the same large block that this sample came from.


end grain closeup (upside down) and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


I bought a good-sized plank of very clean cypress and then cleverly forgot to take any pictures of it, so here are some pics, including a end-grain closeup, of a couple of small planks cut from the bigger one and now ready to be used in my laminated bowls.


small plank and end grain


end grain closeup of the piece directly above


plank and closeup


finished piece of cypress in the side of a box. The bottom plank has to be quartersawn since the side edge shown at the bottom of this picture is flat cut.


plank



NOTE: the following flooring samples of "Bermuda" cypress were all obtained from the same flooring vendor and flooring vendors are notoriously unreliable about properly identifying woods. This one, for example, calls goncalo alves "Patagonian rosewood", an utterly meaningless designation, although I must admit that as a marketing term it beats the hell of out "goncalo alves" which to American ears does sound particularly euphonious. But I ramble. My point is that I have NO idea whether any of these pieces have ever seen Bermuda. I have reported them here as they were sold to me, but I'm dubious about their designations.

NOT a raw wood color
NOT a raw wood color
two flooring samples of Bermuda cypress both of which have been finished with a hard, shiny finishing agent that clearly has deepened and enriched the color.


the pieces directly above, after I sanded off the finish --- these were both thin plywood layers, so I could not get a end grain pic. Although it's not totally obvious, because of the pic croping, these two pieces were cut from adjacent sections of the same larger plank --- I'm sure you can see it now that I've pointed it out.

end Bermuda cypress flooring samples





veneer sheet and closeup



The Wood Book pics


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
Arizona cypress (Cupressus arizonica) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for each of the 3 views


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
Gowen's cypress (Cupressus goveniana, also listed as Northwest Coast cypress) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for each of the 3 views

web pics:


log cross section


plank with wet and dry sections


end grain just listed as cypress


plank listed as pond cypress / Taxodium ascendens


plank listed as sugi (a Japanese cypress) / Cryptomeria japonica --- the size is very approximately 3" x 1.25" and both levels of enlargement are present so the grain shows up very nicely


planks listed as cypress / Cupressus sempervirens


plank listed as Arizona cypress / Cupressus arizonica


plank listed as cypress / Cupressus lawsoniana


turning stock listed as Arizona cypress, but not saying which species but it's probably Cupressus arizonica (see fact sheet for discussion of cypress names)


Chinese cypress


burl


planks with no designation other than just "cypress"


plank with a color that is just silly


flooring with no designation other than just "cypress"


two views of the same pair of planks


figured cypress slabs


spalted cypress


spalted cypress end grain


spalted cypress pen blanks

scales listed as cypress burl --- both levels of enlargement are present for all 3


"red" cypress


a rough board


Arizona cypress pen blanks, moistened for the pic which was provided by Dave Cumming, whom I thank.


bowl blank listed as just cypress


pen blanks listed as curly white cypress


Southern Cypress veneer


Fitzroy cypress and end grain


fitzroy cypress (Fitzroya cupressoides) planks


veneer listed as just cypress


cypress molding with both levels of enlargement present


cypress armoire


various bowls just labeled as "cypress"


natural edge bowls


two views of the same bowl


platter


bowl of Arizona cypress


part of an entire house (lodge?) made of cypress. Although it didn't say which kind, the flooring, paneling, beams, etc. are all cypress. Notice how the large vertical support pole is a debarked tree section that has a huge mortise for the crossbeam.




a cypress bowl, fresh off the lathe; no finish as yet but sanded to 320-grit. Personally, I really don't like this bowl. To me it looks like one piece of a cheap salad bowl set. Still, you never know how these things will turn out 'til you do them and this was an easy turn since cypress is very soft and light. The sharply delineated early wood / late wood grain pattern is at least interesting.


same thing with a few coats of polyurethane; notice how the finish blurs the previously sharp demarcation between early and late growth.