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NOTE: there is rarely any "standard" or "typical" look for a wood so take what's in this table with a grain of salt
the REST of the pictures on this page will give you a better overall feel for this wood

anigre / Pouteria spp. (formerly Aningeria spp.)

5" x 5" flat cut, 5" x 5" quartersawn, 3/4" wide end grain, and a 1/4" x 1/4" end grain closeup.

Diffuse porous with small pores in radial strands, lots of banded parenchyma. Growth ring boundaries are usually very vague but discernible, rays barely discernible at 10X



my samples:


both sides of a sample plank of anigre / Aningeria robosta (a misspelling of robusta); common names shown on the sample are aningeria and aniegre but in the US those names are rare --- HUGE enlargements are present. Aningeria robusta is now considered just a synonym of Pouteria robusta.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of anigre / Aningeria robosta (a misspelling of robusta)--- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Aningeria robusta is now considered just a synonym of Pouteria robusta.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of anigre / Aningeria robosta (a misspelling of robusta) --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Aningeria robusta is now considered just a synonym of Pouteria robusta.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


both sides of a sample plank of anigre / Aningeria altissima --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Because of the lines in the surface, the vendor of this piece calls it "cat's claw" anigre but clearly it should be called "bear claw". The indented grain can be clearly seen in the end grain shot. Aningeria altissima is now considered just a synonym of Pouteria altissima.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of anigre / Aningeria altissima --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Because of the lines in the surface, the vendor of this piece calls it "cat's claw" anigre but clearly it should be called "bear claw". The indented grain can be clearly seen in the end grain shot. Aningeria robusta is now considered just a synonym of Pouteria robusta.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of anigre / Aningeria spp. --- HUGE enlargements are present. Aningeria spp. is now considered just a synonym of Pouteria spp.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


quartersawn plank --- color is correct in my pic; the one to the right is the web pic posted by the vendor from whom I bought a set of planks. The wood is more dull than he represented it to be, and that is typical of his eBay postings, but he's not as bad as the vendor that I use throughout this site to show REALLY bad misrepresentation.



a common occurrence in anigre is the existence of a blue stain, as seen in this small plank. The first pic is of the piece raw and then I fine-sanded it. As you can see, fine sanding makes little to no difference in the color. This piece was in a mixed lot that I got just before having received a good-sized plank with the blue stain, which I had ordered to see what it looked like. Had I seen this sample first, I would NOT have ordered the plank, as the blue stain is not an interesting occurrence, really, just an ugly blotchy effect that only detracts from the appearance of the wood. Also, as you can see, the stain is only nominally blue in color although it is always referred to as a "blue" stain. I would not recommend that you knowingly buy anigre with the blue stain. The large plank is shown directly below


same piece as directly above, but moistened with water


anigre plank with blue stain, and closeup (see discussion directly above)


two small samples, one with blue stain and one without, cut from the larger plank above and fine sanded


both end of the small samples directly above


both end grain closeups of the small samples directly above


both END GRAIN UPDATEs of the piece directly above


planks and closeup --- these don't look much like anigre to me, but the vendor I bought it from is reputable, so I guess they are.

NOTE: now that I have done the end grain update, I see that there is no possibility that these are anigre. I'll see if I can figure out what they are and move them to the appropriate page.


a piece cut from the plank above and more or less medium-fine sanded


end grain, end grain closeup, and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


a couple of small planks --- the slightly yellowish color is correct.


quartersawn veneer and closeup


quartersawn veneer and closeup


flat cut veneer with a small amount of curl


veneer --- these two small sheets are from the same larger sheet. The one on the left is from an area that had some curl and the one on the right was chosen for the cathedral grain and has very little curl (although it does have slightly more than what shows up here)


quartersawn veneer


figured veneer --- color is correct; this is really lively stuff! The pattern is sometimes called "razor mottle" veneer, which is a form of mottle figure where the mottle is very sharp and distinct; compare this to the "normal" mottle directly below. As a side note, the sheet on the left is an unusually flexible veneer with a somewhat rubbery feel to it.


mottled veneer and a closeup of the same sheet --- compare this to the razor mottle directly above --- this "normal" mottle is very vague compared to the sharp mottle figure called "razor" mottle


figured (lightly mottled) flat cut veneer


mottled quartersawn veneer --- fairly strong sheen on this


fiddleback veneer. Although this is indeed a true fiddleback figure, the wood is, to my mind, far too boring to actually use on the back of a fiddle. The colors are correct --- these pieces were selected for color variations.


birdseye anigre --- the birdseye figure is quite pronounced and shows up better in reality than it does in this picture (although it does NOT rival bird's eye maple for figure). The color is correct, but the gloss is from the flash and is unrealistic. Although I do not find this to be a particularly attractive variety of anigre, it is somewhat more attractive than this picture (or the web pictures below) represent, especially when viewed at an angle that shows off the eyes to good effect, which this picture does not. Also, this sample is weak to average --- stronger eye figure is sometimes present in the birdseye variety of this species as can be seen in a couple of the web pics below.


bird's eye anigre sheet and closeup --- this sheet has stronger eyes than the one directly above.

web pics:
I doubt the bright golden yellow colors of some pieces. This wood DOES come in some yellowish shades of tan,
but I've never seen it as bright as some of these pictures. The darker pics are more representative



flat cut plank with wet and dry sections


plank with blue stain, described more fully in in the samples I show at the top of the page (of blue stain)


planks


flat cut plank and closeup


flat cut --- one plank, 2 veneer


figured planks --- each has a mottle figure that is not quite strong enough or regular enough to warrent the designation razor mottle --- see the veneer sheets down below for a strong razor mottle


figured planks


quartersawn planks


planks listed as "bird's eye" anigre, and they do appear to have at least a weak form of that figure. See the veneer pics by in my own samples above and in the veneer pics down below for much better examples


figured veneer --- as you can see, the term "figured" is sometimes used with this wood to denote fiddleback and sometimes to denote block mottle, and sometimes just a mild curl.


figured veneer sheet with both levels of closeup


fiddleback planks --- the ones with the brightest color are from the BogusColorVendor


quartersawn veneer --- the bright yellow/orange color is doubtful


quartersawn veneer. I doubt the green color.


veneer


misc veneer all from the same vendor and all listed as anegre / aningeria spp. --- The first is flat cut, the 2nd is flat cut figured, the 3rd is quartersawn and the 4th is quartersawn figured


veneer, all from the same vendor


veneer sheet closeups with both levels of enlargements. These are all from the same vendor as the set directly above.


fiddleback veneer


fiddleback veneer, all from the same vendor


fiddleback veneer sheet closeups with both levels of enlargement. These are both from the same vendor as the set directly above. The second of these is much to weak to legitimately be sold as fiddleback, but many vendors are not even remotely rigorous about such distinctions.


listed as "quartersawn fiddleback" (what most vendors would just call fiddleback) --- I doubt the bright yellow color


quartersawn mottled veneer


quartersawn figured veneer. "Figured" for anigre generally means mottled but may mean curly


listed as quilted veneer, some vendors would list this as "fiddleback", some as "curly", some as "quilted"


curly veneer


these were all listed as "figured" veneer, showing the wide range of figure that is generically listed as "figured" for this species. CLearly the 2nd piece is fiddleback and the 4th one is a razor mottle, the 5th one is curly/fiddleback


figured veneer of the type generally meant by the term "figured" (that is, it is NOT fiddleback, it is more of a razor mottle)


razor mottle veneer


veneer not listed as any particular type, but clearly the four are flat cut, quartersawn, and two pieces of fiddleback.


flat cut veneer


bird's eye veneer with an unusually strong eye figure


bird's eye veneer


bird's eye veneer --- the greenish shade is unrealistic and the real wood is more likely to be more of a tan without the heavy green. See my own sample (of bird's eye) for a more realistic picture. In fact, my own sample was bought from the vendor where I got these pictures and this vendor tends to show many woods as green regardless of the true color.


block mottle veneer --- I find the washed out gray color unlikely, but cannot say for sure that it is false. I suspect the wood is more tan in both cases.


crotch veneer