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ALDER

Alnus spp.





my samples:




sample plank and end grain sold to me as red alder / Alnus oregona --- This is also known as Oregon alder.


end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of red alder / Alnus rubra --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of red alder / Alnus rubra --- HUGE enlargements are present.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


first face and the end grain of a sample of red alder / Alnus rubra. This part of a collection which is discussed here: COLLECTION A


the second face, before and after sanding, showing how the patina from aging is only surface deep.


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above.



both sides and both ends of a sample piece that was sold to me as "European alder" but I am very dubious about this sample being in the genus Aldus because according to a statement on a very reputable web site and born out by all of my other samples in this genus, the rays are almost always uniseriate although aggregate rays up to 3-seriate can be found. The rays on this sample are clearly way more than 3 cells wide. The REST of the characteristics of the wood are, however, exactly like the rest of my samples in this genus.


end grain of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of mountain alder / Alnus tenuifolia --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of mountain alder / Alnus tenuifolia --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of sitka alder / Alnus sinuata --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above. Note the triangular pith shape, which is strongly indicative of the Alnus genus (in softwoods it is indicative of the genus Pinus).


both sides of a sample plank of sitka alder / Alnus sinuata --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of speckled alder / Alnus rugosa --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of speckled alder / Alnus rugosa --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Note the lightly indented rings at the rays on the left side of the lamination (end grain). The heartwood color in the pics has too much green tint but if I get rid of that then the sapwood looks way too red (right now the sapwood looks correct)


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of speckled alder / Alnus rugosa --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The color correction could only get one right (heart or sap) so I chose heart ... sapwood should be light tan w/ no red tint (as shown in the two samples directly above this one) and actually, the heartwood still has a very slight green tint that is not in the wood. If I get rid of it, the sapwood looks even more red.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of speckled alder / Alnus rugosa --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


both sides of a sample plank of speckled alder / Alnus rugosa --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of ilite (stunted alder) / Alnus jorullensis --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of ilite (stunted alder) / Alnus jorullensis --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Nepal alder / Alnus nepalensis --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.



end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of Nepal alder / Alnus nepalensis --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


sold to me as "red alder" (veneer). The color on this is not quite right. The wood is a little more creamy than the picture shows.



a long veneer sheet and a couple of closeups from it. The distance pic is just slightly too red but the closeups have very accurate color.


This veneer sheet was loaned to me by John Koehn whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


burl veneer in bookmatched pairs



The Wood Book pics


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
white alder (Alnus rhombifolia, also listed as California alder and mountain alder) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for each of the 3 views


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
Oregon alder (Alnus oregona, also listed as red alder) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for each of the 3 views.



web pics:


planks with wet and dry sections; the first was listed as Alnus glutinosa and is quartersawn and the second is flat cut


planks


several views of a pile of planks


quartersawn plank listed as American alder / Alnus rubra


turning stock listed as Pacific alder / Alnus rubra


planks identified as "frogskin" alder --- I don't know if that's just a made-up marketing term or a more widely recognized type of figure.


alder veneer


bookmatched figured veneer listed as Alnus glutinosa


veneer listed as Alnus glutinosa


veneer listed as American alder / Alnus rubra


veneer listed as European alder / Alnus Glutinosa


burl veneer


red alder planks


red alder veneer


listed as "knotty" alder


turning stock


alder planks all from one vendor


another set of planks, all from one vendor


alder plywood


sets for guitar backs, all from one vendor


spalted alder, some showing end grain --- all of these pics show up better in the enlargements. Alder DOES get black-line spalting but it also is highly prone to white rot, which many vendors also call spalting. All of these pieces have white rot and some have black-line spalting as well. The different kinds of spalting are produced by different fungii.


bowl blanks with white-rot spalting


spalted scales with both black-line and white-rot spalting.


pen blanks --- the first set is listed as spalted angle cut, the second as spalted and the third as wormy. I have no idea how accurate the color is on any of these but I suspect that it is WAY off since this doesn't even begin to look like any alder I've ever seen.


pen blanks with both black-line and white-rot spalting --- these have been stabilized and I don't know how much that caused the darker-than-usual color for alder or these pieces are just unusually dark alder


solid pieces sold as guitar blanks --- the first one is spalted and shows up better in the enlargement


guitar backs


quilted plank


listed as "bird's eye" alder but I'm not confident of either that designation or the color


guitar body


doors made from alder --- I'm guessing that the first 2 have some kind of darkening finish on them, but it could just be the lighting.





kid's box


alder bowls


bowl listed as alder / Alnus rubra --- seems to be heavy with either mineral stain or blue stain


carved alder bowls


segmented alder platter


segmented alder salad bowl


two pics of the same bowl. I suspect the one on the right is closer to the correct color, but in any case this is yet another example of the difficulties of getting color-correct pics of wood on the internet.


hollow form listed as red alder


bowls listed as red alder


bowls listed as spalted alder


spalted alder hollow form