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OAK, BOG

Quercus spp.


A NOTE ABOUT OAKS IN THE USA AND EUROPE



Quercus spp. of the family Fagaceae. There are numerous species in the genus Quercus that are listed as bog oak ... I guess it just depends on which one fell in the bog ... but mostly it is listed as English/European oak (Quercus robur), which makes sense since the bogs are IN England and Europe.



my samples:


both sides of a sample plank of bog oak / Quercus spp. --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributionsDATE from directly above


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of bog oak / Quercus spp. --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of bog oak / Quercus spp. --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


two contiguous surfaces of a stick of what should properly be called "swamp oak" since it was recovered from a swamp in Ohio instead of a bog in Europe. This piece was sent to me by Charles Hurley for identification. I got a little weirded out when I was processing this sample because as I sanded it down, I could see that the sides and faces all clearly looked like oak but the end grain did not show the rays that are always present in oak. Turns out the rays are clearly there, just VERY hard to distinguish because the process that darkened the color of the piece made the rays almost exactly the same color as the rest of the wood. In the end grain closeups below, I have pointed out the rays so you can see what I mean.


end grain


closeups of both ends of the piece directly above, with the rays pointed out in blue (they are easier to see in the enlargements)


END GRAIN UPDATE of the left pic directly above. HUGE enlargements are present.


a couple of small pieces contributed by Iain Rankin, whom I thank for this and other contributions. Iain reports that these particular pieces are from planks that are not really workable, being somewhat curmbly. This is not generally the case with bog oak, as witness by the fact that it is even sometimes sliced into veneer, although I can certainly confirm it to be true of these little pieces.

bog oak pics contributed by Iain Rankin, whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


veneer, all from the same lot



web pics:


end grain


planks


bog oak stump scales


English oak turned into bog oak in Croatia


listed as figured bog oak veneer but the color is VERY light for bog oak


flat cut and quartersawn veneer listed as bog oak / Quercus robur


veneer


veneer, all from the same vendor


veneer sheet closeups with both levels of enlargement





pin cushion carved from bog oak --- piece is about 2 1/2 inches in diameter


pen listed as swamp oak


bench top of bog oak


pen turned from bog oak / Quercus spp., from in the Ukraine. Photograph contributed to the site by the pen turner, Bruce Selyem, whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The pen is finished with shellwax.


pen turned from bog oak / Quercus spp., from in the Ukraine. Photograph contributed to the site by the pen turner, Bruce Selyem, whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The pen is finished with shellwax.