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TAMARISK

Tamarix spp.

Tamarix spp. of the family Tamaricaceae

There are at least the following members of the genus Tamarix that have the name tamarisk as all or part of one or more of their common names:

Except as specifically stated, I have no idea which of those species are shown on this page nor do I know what differences, if any, exist among the species.

In Arizona and Colorado, tamarisk is considered an invasive, noxious weed. There is a form of tamarisk that only grows to the size of a large bush, mainly along riverbeds and it reported uses a great deal of water. This form of Tamarisk is generally called salt cedar as well as tamarisk and I believe it is one of the two species Tamarix articulata and Tamarix gallica.

Other form/species, also called tamarisk or salt cedar, get MUCH bigger, I am told by correspondent Fred Rayworth of Nevada. Fred tells me that he's seen them out there as much as 5 feet DBH and probably 70 feet high and that those are also considered invasive. Thanks for that information, Fred. I've also been told by another person that they grow to at least 4 feet DBH in Las Vegas if they are watered adequately, and that's just the biggest he's seen but he has no reason to doubt that they can get to 5 feet.

The colors have range that includes at least salmon red and shades of brown/tan, sometimes with shades of light orange.

my samples:
NOTE: these pics were all taken in very bright incandescent lighting ("soft white" at 2700K)
colors will vary under other lighting conditions


both sides of a sample plank of small flowered tamarisk / Tamarix parviflora --- HUGE enlargements are present. Notice the strong ray flakes, particularly in the enlargement of the 2nd side


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of small flowered tamarisk / Tamarix parviflora --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of small flowered tamarisk / Tamarix parviflora --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above

both of the pieces for the pics below were contributed by Eric Goertz, whom I thank for these nifty pieces of wood. They are semi-crotch pieces and so do not have quite a normal representative grain but the first one in particular is not far off. NOTE: HUGE enlargements are present for these pics


both sides of a small plank


end grains of the piece directly above


end grain closeups of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


face grain closeups of the piece directly above


side grain closeups of the piece directly above


both sides of a small crotch section


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


face grain closeup of the piece directly above


NOT A RAW WOOD COLOR --- both faces of this sample have a light coat of clear paste wax
both sides of a sample plank of tamarisk / Tamarix spp. --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Based on the color I'd say there's a good chance this piece is pure sapwood. As for the color, I don't think the paste wax made any difference in this one at all but I mention it just for the sake of completeness.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of tamarisk / Tamarix spp. --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. As you can see from Mark's writing on the front of the piece, he thinks it might be Tamarix ramosissima or Tamarix chinensis but we are not sure if it's either one.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of tamarisk / Tamarix spp. --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Like the sample directly above, Mark thinks it might be Tamarix ramosissima or Tamarix chinensis but we are not sure if it's either one.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above



All of the pics in this section are from the two bole sections shown directly below. They were contributed to the site by Dave Pimental who tells me they were harvested along the San Rafael River in south central Utah. Thanks, Dave, these make a great addition to the site. My friend Mark Peet tells me that he heard from a Utah wood specialist that the tamarisk eradication along the San Rafael River was a single species, Tamarix ramosissima, common name salt cedar, so it's almost a certainty that that's what this is.


the two bole sections and the end grains. I forgot to note the dimensions but they were approximately 10" long and 8" long


Both ends of the bigger piece then both ends of the smaller piece. The first pic is of an end from which I did not slice off the finish that Dave put on them to protect them from cracking. The smaller piece is getting ready to split off into two more smaller boles.


end grain closeups of each piece, shown here at 12X. The larger piece, on the left, was sanded to about 300 or 400 grit, the smaller one on the right hardly at all.


the sample pieces that I made from the two bole sections. My goal was to get at least one good flat cut sample and one good quartersawn sample and at least one good IWCS-sized sample for my friend Mark Peet. I got all that and more. I note that these pieces have slightly thinner rays than some of the formal samples up above.


a flat cut sample


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


a quartersawn sample, showing some nice ray flakes on the first face. They are stronger on the wood than what shows up in this pic


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


a sample out of the middle of the larger bole section, deliberately cut to have a boxed pith


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


another flat cut sample


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above. Note the large aggregate ray on the right side of the end grain

end of Dave Pimental's set



web pics:


burl


cluster burl


listed as a tamarisk slab and closeup, clearly moistened for the pic.


slab and closeup listed as salt cedar / tamarisk --- the closeup has both enlargements present and shows the grain very nicely.


cookie showing no rays


cookie listed as Arizona tamarisk --- I'm dubious about the highly saturated color. I notice that this one has strong rays


Arizona tamarisk burl pen blanks


Israeli tamarisk earrings showing strong rays


tamarisk burl pen barrels --- I'm doubtful about the deep red color but don't know this wood well enough to say that it's wrong


tamarisk box


tamarisk burl hollow forms --- I think all of these are tamarisk from Arizona or Colorado