open main page here



MYRTLE

botanical name unknown

There are at well over 100 species worldwide, from at least 40 different genera, that have the word myrtle as all or part of one or more of their common names and except as specifically stated, I have no idea which of them are represented on this page.

In the USA, a wood sold as "myrtle" is very likely California laurel which now has its own page on this site. Woods sold as "Oregon myrtle" or "California myrtle" are definitely California laurel.

NOTE: much of the wood in the "web pics" section is likely California laurel (Oregon myrtle) and should be on that page, but when I collected those pics, I did not plan on breaking out California laurel spearately so did not keep good track.

The names "crape myrtle" and "crape myrtle" seem to be used in about the same numbers (at the time of this writing, Google gets just over 600,000 hits on each spelling) but I've used "crepe" throughout for consistency, regardless of the name the vendors have used.

my samples:
NOTE: these pics were all taken in very bright incandescent lighting --- colors will vary under other lighting conditions


both sides of a sample plank of crepe myrtle / Lagerstroemia indica --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above



both sides of a sample plank of crepe myrtle / Lagerstroemia indica --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of crepe myrtle / Lagerstroemia indica --- HUGE enlargements are present.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of wax myrtle / Myrica cerifera --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Note that the first face was sanded to 240 grit and the second face was not and this accounts for minor differences in color between the two and the better resolution of the detail characteristics as seen in the first one. Myrica cerifera is a synonym of Morella cerifera.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of wax myrtle / Myrica cerifera --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Note that the first face was sanded to 240 grit and the second face was not and this accounts for minor differences in color between the two and the better resolution of the detail characteristics as seen in the first one. Myrica cerifera is a synonym of Morella cerifera.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of wax myrtle / Myrica cerifera --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Myrica cerifera is a synonym of Morella cerifera.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above




this set of pics is from a pair of small planks that started off in the same larger plank, as you can pretty well see from the first pic. This set was donated by Jim Glynn, whom I thank for this and his several other donations to the site.



both pieces and a closeup of each. I flipped the first piece when I did the closeup so as to show a few bug holes.


flip side of the smaller piece


end-and-side-grain shots


side grain --- the small light tan dots are where there were small indentations in the wood that got filled up with sawdust when I sanded the piece.


two end grain closeups from the pieces directly above --- for some reason the pics came out much too dark and in attempting to get the color more correct I have changed it to a washed out look that isn't quite right either, but is more correct than the very dark pics I started with. The non-closeup shots above have accurate color.


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above, with very accurate color



more of my own samples:



both sides and end grains of a small flawed piece that I got in a mixed lot of cut-offs --- I have no idea how representative this is of the wood and in fact one person told me that this might actually be a walnut species and not myrtle at all (BUT ... I now know that the end grain precludes it being walnut).


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above


both sides of a small sample piece of pink myrtle. This is an Australian species and may well not be related to any of the other woods on this page. HUGE enlargements are present


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


Tasmanian myrtle veneer with no botanical designation --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was contributed to the site by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


Tasmanian myrtle veneer --- the first sheet is figured and the second was listed as "flamed" --- HUGE enlargements are present. These samples were contributed to the site by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


Tasamanian myrtle burl veneer --- HUGE enlargements are present. These samples were contributed to the site by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain shot of a piece of Pacific waxmyrtle / Myrica californica --- Pic contributed by Daniel Dill whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The black lines are spalting. Both levels of enlargement are present and it can be seen on them that the grain is very similar to soft maple.


2"x2"x12" turning stick of curly crepe myrtle. It's unseasoned, so I'll stick it in the garage for a couple of years and then clean the end and get end grain pics. LATER: done --- see directly below


all 4 sides of the stick of curly crepe myrtle / unknown botanical name (but probable in the genus Lagerstroemia) shown directly above but after air drying for a couple of years. HUGE enlargements are present.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above



The Wood Book pics


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
California wax-myrtle (Myrica californica, also listed as bayberry and grease-wood) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for each of the 3 views


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
tree-myrtle (Ceanothus arboreus) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for each of the 3 views


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
spiney myrtle (Ceanothus spinosus, also listed as redwood myrtle and lilac) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for each of the 3 views


flat cut, quartersawn, end grain
wax mrytle (Myrica cerifera, also listed as bayberry and candleberry) from The Wood Book --- both levels of enlargement are available for each of the 3 views.

web pics:


slabs


slab, apparently cut out for a rifle butt


veneer --- I'm very dubious about the color on this one but cannot say with authority that it is incorrect.


planks


plank


both sides and a closeup of a plank labeled as "purple veined" myrtle


both sides and a closeup of a plank


ropey curly plank and closeup


curly planks --- 2nd enlargements shows them up nicely; the second one should really be listed as fiddleback


figured planks


just listed as myrtle plank, but clearly this is quilted


turning stock


some really beautiful small myrtle pieces that are laminated and used to make bows by Zane Dodd who sent me these pics (thanks Zane). Check out the enlargements where the grain is more clear.


might also be from Zane ... I've lost track


crotch


spalted mrytle --- the 2nd piece was listed as curly spalted but the spalting is quite weak as far as I can see


highly colored mrytle


"tiger striped"


a turning block (looks like a feather crotch block to me, but was not advertised as such)


feather crotch (both from the same vendor)


two pics of a plank with a feather crotch in it


crotch


rose myrtle


both sides and a closeup of a "golden" myrtle plank from the BogusColorVendor so I'm not confident of the color





figured


curly


curly pen blanks (I believe these have been moistened, so this is not the raw wood color)


pen blanks that have been moistened --- appear to be from a burl but I'm not positive, and they were not listed as burl







fiddleback


both sides and two closeups of a fiddleback plank


fiddleback plank and closeup



burls


a set of burls all from the same vendor


large burl intended for a table-top (moistened for the pic)


more burls


myrtle burl bowl blanks


black mrytle burls


pink myrtle burl (the 2nd piece has been moistened)


burl veneer


listed as "light" burl veneer and I don't know whether that's just a comment on the obvious (that it's a light-colored burl) or whether "light" refers to a commonly used species in the myrtle family.


curly Tasmanian myrtle


Tasmanian pink myrtle burl


curly Tasmanian rose myrtle


Tasmanian burl turning stock --- probably waxed


Tasmanian burl plank


Tasmanian tiger myrtle, waxed plank


tasmanian mottled


Tasmanian veneer


fiddleback Tasmanian myrtle veneer


Tasmanian veneer, bookmatched with a small burl cluster


Tasmanian myrtle burl veneer



products


bowl and platter


bowl shot at a wood shot, just labled "myrtle"


covered bowl


bowl listed as pink myrtle burl


carving of a REALLY hairy guy


guitar back and a thin-wood set ready for making a guitar back


myrtle burl bookmatched pair layed out as a guitar back


natural edge myrtle table top (looks to be quilted but was not listed as such)


myrtle box and closeup of one corner --- I have no idea which color is more accurate.


bowl


bowl by Bryan Nelson (NelsonWood)