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BOXWOOD

botanical name unknown
(but most commonly it is Buxus sempervirens)

There are at least 88 species from 41 genera that have the word boxwood as all or part of one or more of their common names and I have no idea which of them are represented on this page except as specifically noted.

That said, I would add that Buxus sempervirens is what is most often mean by the name boxwood. It is very heavy/dense (60 to 70 lbs/cuft) and very stable. It was long used for precise enginering rulers because of the stability. I went to an engineering college in the 60's and we all had triangular boxwood rulers. Buxus sempervirens grows as a shrub or small tree so is available only in very modest sizes.



my samples:


both sides of a sample plank of European boxwood / Buxus sempervirens --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of European boxwood / Buxus sempervirens --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. This sample is segmented, edge-grain butt-joined but the two pieces are possibly even from the same plank, so I don't consider that a big deal for the sample quality.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


all 4 sides of a sample plank of boxwood --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was contributed to the site by Martin (lonewolf) of Wood Barter, whom I thank for the contribution. I believe this is Buxus sempervirens.


end grain and END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of boxwood / Phyllostylon brasiliensis --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. This species is normally called South American boxwood. The black streak seems to be clearly the result of an Ambrosia beetle's having eaten into it.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


NOT A RAW WOOD COLOR --- both faces of this sample have a light coat of clear paste wax
both sides of a sample plank of boxwood / Buxus sempervirens --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by Mark Peet whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Mark tells me the "heartwood" and the dark lines in this are likely a response to harsh weather conditions, not actual heartwood.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of figured Castello boxwood / Calycophyllum multiflorum --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. The "figure" in this is a curl that is so mild as to be nearly invisible.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of two book matched planks of Castello boxwood / Calycophyllum multiflorum --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. For more detail, see the smaller sample directly below which was cut from one of these.


both sides of a sample plank of Castello boxwood / Calycophyllum multiflorum --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was contributed to the site by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. This was cut from one of the larger planks directly above.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of ivorywood / Calycophyllum multiflorum --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site. Although the vendor of this sample has it legitimately designated as ivorywood, that name leads to confusion because it is used for a number of woods whereas the designation of Castello boxwood is unique.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of maracaibo boxwood / Gossypiospermum praecox --- HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was loaned to me by David Clark whom I thank for this and other contributions to the site.


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


small sample piece presented to me as spalted boxwood


end grain and end grain closeup of the piece directly above


END GRAIN UPDATE from directly above


both sides of a sample plank of boxwood. HUGE enlargements are present. This sample was contributed to the site by Tom King, whom I thank. When I got this, I thought it was olive but the end grain match with boxwood is excellent and that with olive not so much.


end grain closeup and END GRAIN UPDATE of the piece directly above



web pics:


log halves, all from the same vendor, all listed as French boxwood / Buxus sempervirens


planks


planks listed as lemonwood / Calycophyllum multiflorum and although that is a legitimate common name, it is can cause confusion due to use for other woods. I prefer to use the common name Castello boxwood for Calycophyllum multiflorum


plank sold as pau marfim / Calycophyllum multiflorum and although that is a legitimate common name, it is can cause confusion due to use for other woods. I prefer to use the common name Castello boxwood for Calycophyllum multiflorum


plank listed as boxwood, but the color seems unlikely


plank listed as zapatero (aka maracaibo boxwood) / Gossypiospermum praecox


"flamed" boxwood bookmatched pair


listed as "curly castello" boxwood


veneer listed as degame / Calycophyllum multiflorum and although that is a legitimate common name, it is can cause confusion due to use for other woods. I prefer to use the common name Castello boxwood for Calycophyllum multiflorum.


veneer